Corporate News

Fish farming gains ground in Kenya’s ‘grain basket’

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Workers at the Moi University Chepkoilel campus fisheries section work at one of the fish ponds. The institution has 27 ponds and produces an average of 4 tones of fish for research and commercial annually. Photo/JARED NYATAYA (Eldoret)

Workers at the Moi University Chepkoilel campus fisheries section work at one of the fish ponds. The institution has 27 ponds and produces an average of 4 tones of fish for research and commercial annually. Photo/JARED NYATAYA (Eldoret) 

By Barnabas Bii

Posted  Tuesday, July 21  2009 at  00:00

More farmers in the Rift Valley are turning to commercial fish farming driven away by the high cost of inputs and unpredictable market conditions for crops.

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The Fisheries ministry says about 500 farmers have taken to aquaculture, attracted by the ready market and good prices.

The sub-sector, however, accounts for less than one per cent of the national fish production with a total of 1,012 metric tonnes produced last year.

The farmers are gaining from two factors in the new venture: changing diet of residents and the creation of a fisheries and marine department at Moi University.

Rift Valley has been known as the country’s ‘grain basket.’

Residents are turning to fish consumption for its high protein content, a shift that has motivated more farmers to embrace aquaculture.

They have the university to thank for sensitisation on modern farming techniques, which is expected to result in improved profits.

The head of the department at the university, Dr Boaz Kaunda, says Rift Valley, and in particular, the North Rift, has high untapped potential for fish farming to enable the residents increase incomes.

Dr Kaunda regrets that the government has been concentrating on fishing activities on fresh waters and marine at the expense of commercial farming.

Appropriate gear
Dr Kaunda says fish from fresh water contributes 99 per cent of total fish production, earning the country over Sh9 billion last year.

Unfortunately, Kenyan fishermen have been unable to tap the potential in marine fishing due to lack of appropriate gear.

Marine fish is estimated to have a potential of over 150,000 metric tonnes per year.

Among farmers who have adapted fish farming in Rift Valley is Mr Philip Maritim from Uasin Gishu district.

Mr Maritim has constructed three ponds in his one acre plot in Kapsaret and keeps ornamental fish apart from Nile perch, tilapia and African cat fish.

He generates an average Sh5,000 weekly, a venture he says is more profitable than crop farming or keeping dairy cows.

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