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IEBC names Kenyatta winner of election

President Uhuru Kenyatta is the winner of the 2017 General Election, the Independent Electoral and Boundaries Commission (IEBC) chairman Wafula Chebukati has announced Friday evening.

Mr Kenyatta garnered 54.27 per cent of the vote with NASA flagbearer Raila Odinga coming in second with 44.74 per cent.

The result means that there was a difference of 1,441,066 votes between Mr Kenyatta and Mr Odinga.

Mr Kenyatta's win is further sweetened by Jubilee's dominance in parliament, with provisional results indicating that the president's party has raised its share of legislators by nearly half.

NASA on the other hand have about 34 per cent of MPs in the National Assembly, with smaller parties like Kanu, PNU and DP taking up the remaining slots.

IEBC's announcement caps a tight race and days of waiting by Kenyans across the country after they cast their ballots this Tuesday.

It also comes amid claims of irregularities by the official opposition, with Mr Odinga claiming that IEBC's servers were hacked on election day and manipulated to present favourable results for Mr Kenyatta.



Nasa leaders led by Raila Odinga arrive at Bomas of Kenya on August 11, 2017 where presidential results were expected to be announced. PHOTO | JEFF ANGOTE | NMG
Nasa leaders led by Raila Odinga arrive at Bomas of Kenya on August 11, 2017 where presidential results were expected to be announced. PHOTO | JEFF ANGOTE | NMG

The Chebukati-led agency has since denied his allegations, but confirmed Thursday that intruders had attempted to hack its result transmission system but failed.

Mr Odinga also claimed that a source within the IEBC indicated he had led in the polls, but did not substantiate the claims.

NASA 'not part of results'

NASA has refused to be part of the official presidential election results, adding that going to the Supreme Court to challenge the outcome would not be an option.

Mr Mudavadi, the party's chief agent, says IEBC has not addressed their concerns regarding the presidential results and walked out of Bomas shortly after on Friday evening.

Foreign observers' verdict

Election observers have since given the electoral process a clean bill of health, but noted that a manual vetting of the results would help reveal if IEBC's system had indeed been manipulated.

The African Union delegation head and former South African President Thabo Mbeki and former US Secretary of State John Kerry also praised the electoral agency for a job well done.

However, they raised a red flag over the high number of rejected ballots, saying it could be a pointer for the need for voter education.

Meanwhile, envoys in Kenya, led by American Ambassador Robert Godec, noted the foreign observers' assessment of the polling process and urged political leaders to follow the constitution in seeking redress for election disputes.

“No election is perfect, whether in our countries or in Kenya. A range of international and domestic observer missions have praised the commission for its work in exceptionally challenging circumstances,” he told journalists at Bomas.



US Ambassador to Kenya Robert Godec (centre) reads a joint statement by heads of mission in Kenya on on August 11, 2017. He urged Kenyan leaders to follow the constitution to address their grievances. photo | Jeff Angote | Nairobi
US Ambassador to Kenya Robert Godec (centre) reads a joint statement by heads of mission in Kenya on on August 11, 2017. He urged Kenyan leaders to follow the constitution to address their grievances. photo | Jeff Angote | Nairobi

What next?

All eyes will now be on NASA, as supporters of both Mr Kenyatta and Mr Odinga watch to see how Kenya's official opposition will handle the IEBC's announcement.

Mr Odinga's camp had yesterday demanded that the electoral agency declare him the winner on the basis of figures from a confidential source IEBC placing him ahead of Mr Kenyatta in the polls.

Friday's events could also either worsen or calm the tense mood in the country that has been marked by pockets of violence in some parts.

Anxiety was high in some residential areas like Mathare, Huruma and Kibera, where a spot check by Nation revealed that groups of young men were awaiting IEBC's final announcement on Friday.

Others indicated that they were waiting for Mr Odinga to give them the way forward.

On Friday morning, youths numbering between 30 and 50 were spotted by Nation chanting "No Raila No Peace", with the epicentre of the demonstrations around Karanja road all the way to AIC Kibera House of prayer church roundabout.

Many microbusinesses, however, were concerned about the situation, saying the current political mood was hurting their business.

"They should just announce the final results and we forget these elections. People are getting hungry. No money is coming in here," said Mr Jackson Mutiso Nthenge, a resident of Huruma.

Riotous groups had set tyres ablaze tyres in the estate two days ago, with remnants of the riots still evident on the estate's streets today.



A woman walks past anti-riot police in Kisumu on August 10, 2017. The NASA coalition has demanded that its candidate Raila Odinga be declared president. AFP PHOTO | Jennifer Huxta
A woman walks past anti-riot police in Kisumu on August 10, 2017. The NASA coalition has demanded that its candidate Raila Odinga be declared president. AFP PHOTO | Jennifer Huxta

Additional reporting by Collins Omulo and Fred Mukinda

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