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Doctors set for extra cash with medical app

From left-ConnectMed CEO Melissa Mccoy, Dr Fibian Nyorita and Dismus Masheti. PHOTO | SALATON NJAU
From left-ConnectMed CEO Melissa Mccoy, Dr Fibian Nyorita and Dismus Masheti. PHOTO | SALATON NJAU 

A South African Internet firm yesterday announced partnership with 30 doctors to launch Kenya’s first commercial ‘doctors-on-call’ service payable via mobile phone or card and set to increase the practitioner’s revenue streams.

ConnectMed, a mobile-based software application launched Monday in Nairobi, creates a platform where patients can consult via a web-cam based doctor-patient portal and get prescription advice. Payments are made via mobile money and bank cards payment platforms.

The product’s proponent Mellisa McCoy, a trained medical technologist and founder of the app said their team of doctors had been locally vetted and found fit to serve patients at any time from anywhere, thereby enabling Kenyans experiencing non-emergency ailments to have access to medical service.

“We are paying doctors competitively enabling them engage a patient for up to 15 minutes thereby creating an online patient history. Patients will no longer worry of any prevailing situation as doctors will be available to attend to patients from the safety of their clinics, homes or anywhere they choose,” she said.

Dr Fibian Nyorita, a general practitioner now on attachment at Aga Khan University Hospital’s Valley Arcade clinic, said all doctors had been vetted and categorised based on their speciality, with individual doctors urged to bring on board their list of patients online to facilitate online booking of appointments.

“ConnectMed boosts formation of a doctor’s consultation timetable without need for manual booking as patients will decide whether to consult online or fix an appointment to visit a doctor’s clinic,” she said adding the online app creates a new revenue source for doctors.

Ms McCoy said they began carrying out a pilot on the new service during the early days of the 100-day long doctors’ strike that ended last week.

Their service saw 50 patients placed on the app where the doctors provided advice with serious cases referred to private hospitals for follow-ups.

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