Counties

City Hall hits Sh2m daily parking revenue target in Nairobi crackdown

The county says clamping will go a notch higher to improve revenue collection. FILE PHOTO | NMG
The county says clamping will go a notch higher to improve revenue collection. FILE PHOTO | NMG  

City Hall hit its daily parking revenue target of Sh2 million in a crackdown that sought to curb collusion between its workers and motorists.

The operation led by senior executives involved clamping vehicles without payment receipts in the CBD, Westlands and Industrial Area.

County secretary Robert Ayisi, all chief officers and the revenue enforcement team combed the streets looking for suspected non-payers.

John Ntoiti, the head of revenue enforcement team, said the operation was necessitated by parking revenue going down or remaining stagnant.
City Hall automated parking fees collection to stem revenue leakages, but collusion between motorists and employees saw car owners avoid paying the Sh300 fees.

“We have hit the target of Sh2 million from the historic Sh1.4 million. Our revenue has been stagnant and now we want to ensure that the team leading this operation will not relent until all our dues are paid,” said Dr Ntoiti.

A total of 36 vehicles in the CBD, 40 in Westlands and over 20 in Industrial Area were clamped yesterday, he said, adding that the increased parking revenue was a sign that the county can meet its targets if enforcement tighter.

Dr Ntoiti accused motorists of using shortcuts to avoid remitting county revenue despite the process going digital to avoid inconveniences, especially where the parking attendant was not in sight.

Dr Ntoiti warned that all non-payers will henceforth be clamped under tight supervision to remove gaps through which the county headed by Evans Kidero as governor was losing the much-needed revenues.

“Let the motorists be warned that we have more clamping machines than the number of vehicles parked in the city; we will carry out the clampdown until we get our revenue as required,” said Dr Ntoiti.

He added that the county was embarking on a campaign to rid the city of non-payment of rates, like land payments, which partly hurt service delivery.