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Technology

Seacom wins award for bandwidth connectivity

A user connects to the Internet via the Seacom fibre optic cable during its commissioning in July, 2009. Undersea fibre-optic cable operator Seacom has been named the best Pan African initiative at the AfricaCom Awards in Cape Town. Photo/FILE
A user connects to the Internet via the Seacom fibre optic cable during its commissioning in July, 2009. Undersea fibre-optic cable operator Seacom has been named the best Pan African initiative at the AfricaCom Awards in Cape Town. Photo/FILE  

Undersea fibre-optic cable operator Seacom has been named the best Pan African initiative at the AfricaCom Awards in Cape Town.

The award recognises initiatives to improve telecommunications at a regional or continental level.

Other than Seacom, there are other three cables expected to connect the region to the rest of the world, including, Teams, Eassy and Lion.

“Seacom is honoured to have been recognised for its effort in bringing much needed bandwidth connectivity to east and southern Africa. With more and more countries getting connected to the rest of the world through the Seacom system, it is only a matter of time before we see the direct socio-economic benefits that cheap and readily available bandwidth will have on the region,” said Seacom CEO Brian Herlihy.

The awards ceremony formed part of the AfricaCom Congress, a yearly two day pan-African communications event attended by African operators, service providers, ministries, regulators and equipment and solutions providers in Africa.

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Communication carriers

Seacom, which is privately funded and over 75 per cent African owned, assists communication carriers in south and east Africa through the sale of wholesale international capacity to global networks through India and Europe.

The undersea fibre optic cable system provides African retail carriers with equal and open access to inexpensive bandwidth, removing the international infrastructure bottleneck and supporting east and southern African economic growth.

Its commencement is timely to meet bandwidth needs of the 2010 World cup slated for South Africa.

East African, which was the only part of the globe without undersea fibre connectivity, can now expect faster Internet services, huge increases in bandwidth, an end to slow dial-up connections and crackling long-distance calls and, above all, a reduction in the cost of accessing the Internet.

The cable runs along the eastern seaboard of Africa, creating a digital superhighway that links South Africa, Mozambique, Tanzania and Kenya with Europe and South Asia. 

Within East Africa, it connects Kampala and Rwanda through the Kenya Data Network which has built a terrestrial fibre optic.

It extends to Marseilles, France, where it connects to Interoute’s network providing a speed-of-light route to Europe, North America and the Middle East.

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