Engineering students win registration row

Hundreds of students who graduated with engineering degrees from three universities eight years ago were Tuesday granted a major reprieve.

Deputy Chief Justice Philomena Mwilu. PHOTO | JEFF ANGOTE 

IN SUMMARY

  • Engineers Registration Board has been directed to register graduates who had graduated from Egerton, Moi and Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology between 2004 and 2010.
  • In a judgment delivered on Tuesday by Deputy Chief Justice Philomena Mwilu on behalf of other Supreme Court judges who supported the majority verdict, the court found that the ERB had acted unlawfully by declining to register them as graduate engineers.

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Hundreds of students who graduated with engineering degrees from three universities eight years ago were Tuesday granted a major reprieve after the Engineers Registration Board (ERB) was directed to register them.

They had graduated from Egerton, Moi and Masinde Muliro University of Science and Technology between 2004 and 2010, but their efforts to be registered as engineers were thwarted by ERB.

In a judgment delivered on Tuesday by Deputy Chief Justice Philomena Mwilu on behalf of other Supreme Court judges who supported the majority verdict, the court found that the ERB had acted unlawfully by declining to register them as graduate engineers.

“We find that the Board had violated the rights of the applicants to fair administrative action, and human dignity, when it declined to register them as required under the law,” ruled justice Mwilu.

The Supreme Court directed the ERB to register them within 21 days.

After the ERB rejection the graduates the petitioned the High Court and won, but the Board appealed to the Appellate Court, which overturned the lower court’s judgment.

The petitioners thus approached the superior court.

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The Supreme Court also directed the Board to pay each of the applicants, general damages assessed at Sh200,000 with interest.

The Board was also slapped with costs of the case.

Supreme Court judge Njoki Ndung'u delivered the minority dissent judgment.

The affected students who had filled the court applauded the decision, saying justice had finally been served.

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