Editorials

Kenya, UK talks welcome

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President Kenyatta meeting with UK Prime Minister Boris Johnson. FILE PHOTO | NMG

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Summary

  • The diplomatic spat between Kenya and the UK over Covid-related travel advisories unfortunately threatens long-standing ties between the two countries.
  • A drawn-out standoff could hurt trade, regional security and the war on the pandemic.
  • That is why we support the reported efforts aimed at normalising relations between the two countries.

The diplomatic spat between Kenya and the UK over Covid-related travel advisories unfortunately threatens long-standing ties between the two countries.

A drawn-out standoff could hurt trade, regional security and the war on the pandemic.

That is why we support the reported efforts aimed at normalising relations between the two countries.

It is in the interest of both of them to ensure that trade and travel continue uninterrupted, even as they address the concerns each party have about their respective handling of the Covid-19 crisis.

The UK’s jitters about a spike in the Covid-19 cases in Kenya, which is experiencing a third wave of the pandemic, is understandable given that it has been one of the hardest-hit countries.

For its part, Kenya is also entitled to feel that the measures by the UK were uncalled for given the government’s relatively strong response to the pandemic.

Both sides have genuine concerns on the matter, which the talks should be able to address.

A win-win solution would ensure that the two countries forge a common front in the war on the coronavirus while securing the socio-economic benefits of thriving bilateral relations.

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