Editorials

Widen vandalism fight

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National Youth Service (NYS) personnel working on the old metre-gauge railway line at Nanyuki on January 30. FILE PHOTO | NMG

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Summary

  • Vandals carted away crucial parts such a sleepers, nuts and clips in the sections under repair, meaning the the cost of rehabilitation will go.
  • The government must now make the crime very expensive for both the vandals and the beneficiaries of the stolen parts if it is to save the current and future projects.

The revelation that the upgrade of the metre-gauge railway lines in the country will fall behind schedule due to vandalism points to the serious threat the vice poses on Kenya’s infrastructure.

Vandals carted away crucial parts such a sleepers, nuts and clips in the sections under repair, meaning the the cost of rehabilitation will go.

The government must now make the crime very expensive for both the vandals and the beneficiaries of the stolen parts if it is to save the current and future projects.

Entities such as Kenya Power, Kenya Electricity Transmission Company and Kenya Urban Roads Authority have in the recent past bemoaned wanton vandalism.

Vandals have been targeting utilities such as electricity cables, street piles and lights, traffic lights, guard rails, road signs and drainage slabs.

Most of the vandalised parts usually find their way into small industries, which see this as an opportunity to get cheap raw materials for their goods.

The government has in the past paid more attention in arresting and prosecuting those caught with stolen parts but more needs to be done if the vice is to stop.