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Counties

Cart pushers banned from garbage site

A man pulling water on a cart. FILE PHOTO | NMG
A man pulling water on a cart. FILE PHOTO | NMG 

The Mombasa county government has banned cart pushers from ferrying garbage from various estates to the Kibarani dumpsite.

Kibarani, the oldest dumpsite, is facing closure following Governor Hassan Joho’s order. Mr Joho termed the site an eyesore.

The garbage in the dumpsite has been overflowing into the Indian Ocean and along the Mombasa-Nairobi highway after closure of illegal dumpsites.

The county said Kibarani will be rehabilitated later .

Mr Joho ordered his executives to close the dumpsite by end of June. All the garbage will be transported to the Mwakirunge dumpsite.

The county communication director Richard Chacha said plans to close the Kibarani dumpsite in Mombasa is on top gear.

“So far we have banned cart pushers from ferrying garbage from households to Kibarani dumpsite as we gear up towards its closure,” Mr Chacha said.

Cart pushers have been risking their lives transporting garbage from households and business entities to Kibarani on Mombasa-Nairobi highway after the county shut down more than 54 illegal dumpsites.

Mr Chacha said garbage trucks have been deployed to different estates to collect garbage from households. 

“This is good news. We have been suffering transporting garbage almost three kilometers from Mikindani to Kibarani along the highway. At times unscrupulous cart pushers throw garbage along the highway making the road slippery,” a garbage cart pusher James Kadira said.

Kibarani which is the largest dumpsite in Kenya’s tourism city is an eyesore for both tourists and visitors from Moi International Airport and road travelers from Nairobi. The dumpsite is located along Mombasa-Nairobi highway in Kibarani.

In April, Mr Joho launched a fleet of 12 new garbage collection trucks to help in clearing garbage which has been a menace in Mombasa. Environment executive Godffrey Nato said the fleet will solve the transportation crisis.

The county has been in the limelight for a while for ‘failing’ to deal with the garbage menace which has contributed to mosquito borne diseases.

The city was dirty with uncollected garbage, making it vulnerable to outbreaks of diseases such as chikungunya and dengue fever but the county enhanced its collection mechanism which cleared the garbage in most areas.

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