Companies

Directors set for training in Covid recovery strategy

SCRIBE

Scribe Services partner Benard Kiragu. PHOTO | Diana ngila

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Summary

  • Directors and top managers are set to undergo training on new corporate governance rules amid the push to build sustainable business in the wake of Covid-19 economic fallout.
  • The training will also require firms regulated by the Capital Markets Authority (CMA) to meet the rule that demand a 12-hour annual teaching for boards.
  • Scribes Services, a corporate governance consultancy firm, is behind the training to be held from March 4 targeting board chairs, directors, senior executives and company secretaries.

Directors and top managers are set to undergo training on new corporate governance rules amid the push to build sustainable business in the wake of Covid-19 economic fallout.

The training will also require firms regulated by the Capital Markets Authority (CMA) to meet the rule that demand a 12-hour annual teaching for boards.

Scribes Services, a corporate governance consultancy firm, is behind the training to be held from March 4 targeting board chairs, directors, senior executives and company secretaries.

The course will highlight how executives and directors can manage conflict of interest, interrogate board reports to identify red flags in their firms, board’s role in growing and defending shareholder wealth and their risk management strategy.

This is critical as firms recover from the Covid-19 economic hardships that upended companies’ standard operations and pushed them into losses, underlining the directors’ role in building sustainable strategies.

“The corporate governance training will focus to understand the value of stakeholder engagement with an emphasis of creating sustainable businesses,” said Benard Kiragu, managing partner at Scribes Services.

“The training qualifies under the 12-hour director training requirements of the CMA code of corporate governance.”

The course is anchored on stringent corporate governance rules issued by the Capital Markets Authority that demand disclosure of directors' pay, their term limits, adoption of a code of ethics and review of board composition.