Economy

250,000 go without piped water in Nairobi suburbs

water

An estimated 250,000 of residents in Nairobi suburbs of Ongata Rongai, Kiserian, Matasia and Ngong have gone without piped water for a week. FILE PHOTO | NMG

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Summary

  • An estimated 250,000 of residents in Nairobi suburbs of Ongata Rongai, Kiserian, Matasia and Ngong have gone without piped water for a week after Kenya Power disconnected electricity to the main pumping stations, citing non-payment of bills by water firms.
  • In a notice to residents, the Oloolaiser Water and Sewerage Company confirmed the disconnection of power supply to its key installations — raising concerns about hygiene amid the coronavirus pandemic.

An estimated 250,000 of residents in Nairobi suburbs of Ongata Rongai, Kiserian, Matasia and Ngong have gone without piped water for a week after Kenya Power disconnected electricity to the main pumping stations, citing non-payment of bills by water firms.

In a notice to residents, the Oloolaiser Water and Sewerage Company confirmed the disconnection of power supply to its key installations — raising concerns about hygiene amid the coronavirus pandemic.

“We have equally suffered from the exercise, which have led to the disconnection of all our water pumping stations for accrued and unpaid bills. The company's management is liaising with the county government towards the resolution of the impasse and curb impending crisis that maybe aggravated by the Covid-19 pandemic,” read the notice.

The water company blamed its customers for defaulting on their bills, throwing it into a liquidity crunch which rendered it unable to offset its dues to Kenya Power.

It did not disclose how much it owed the power utility.

“It is further our appeal and kind reminder to all our customers with pending unpaid water bill to please make payments towards full settlement of the bill and partner with us in the restoration of service,” read part of the notice.

Kenya Power, which has also recorded Sh1.2 billion increase in costs to keep power supply on during the pandemic, said it was engaging more customers to clear outstanding bills now running into more than Sh24 billion. It turned out that some of the defaulting customers are essential service providers like water distributors and health facilities.