Economy

KWS woos artefacts and wildlife souvenir donors

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Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) Director General, Brig John Waweru. PHOTO | EVANS HABIL

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Summary

  • The Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) has invited individuals and institutions holding trophies, artefacts and memorabilia to donate them as the agency seeks to preserve the country’s rich conservation history.
  • The KWS has asked all those with wildlife souvenirs, including stuffed animals, wildlife taxidermy, specimen, records, diaries, films, photographs, unique literature and other historical objects to get in touch with the agency.

The Kenya Wildlife Service (KWS) has invited individuals and institutions holding trophies, artefacts and memorabilia to donate them as the agency seeks to preserve the country’s rich conservation history.

The KWS has asked all those with wildlife souvenirs, including stuffed animals, wildlife taxidermy, specimen, records, diaries, films, photographs, unique literature and other historical objects to get in touch with the agency.

The KWS said it is developing a record and archiving System to cover knowledge management and preserve and manage Kenya’s rich wildlife conservation history.

The proposed system, the agency said, would include the history of Kenya from the pre-colonial period through colonial times to the post-independence era.

The KWS said it was keen on acquiring relevant artefacts and documented events for telling the rich wildlife conservation story and its wide influence on the development of Kenya through the time

“The acquisition will be by way of donation, bequeath, grants or any other suitable arrangements that will be arrived at,” said director-general John Waweru in a public notice.

The Wildlife (Conservation and Management) Act categorises a government trophy to include any trophy found without an owner, any protected animal, game animal or a game bird found dead or killed by accident or mistake, any protected animal or game animal killed in defence of life by an unauthorised person or any animal killed by a member of the KWS in the course of his or her duties.

Those who fail to hand over government trophies face a Sh10,000 fine or jail term of between one to three years on conviction.

The law requires individuals and dealers in wildlife trophies to hold certificates of ownership and dealer’s licence, respectively that is issued by a KWS licensing officer.