Health & Fitness

Data dashboards key to achieving healthcare goals

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Summary

  • The Triple Billion targets state that by 2023, one billion more people will benefit from Universal Health Coverage.
  • Whereas WHO is helping countries measure this progress at the country level, granular action is needed by counties to localize dashboards that are specific to their healthcare burdens and dynamics.
  • In order to achieve the common goal of delivering impact, co-creation can play an important role during the development of such dashboards.

In 2019, the World Health Organisation (WHO) set new targets referred to as ‘The Triple Billion Targets’. This is an ambitious initiative aimed at improving the health of billions globally by 2023.

They are an integral foundation of the WHO 13th General Programme of Work (GPW13) results framework which is a new tool designed to measure public healthcare and act as a policy strategy. These targets are not entirely new as their measurement is closely aligned to the 2015 Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs).

The Triple Billion targets state that by 2023, one billion more people will benefit from Universal Health Coverage (UHC), one billion more people will be better protected from health emergencies and one billion more people will enjoy better health and well-being.

The targets are being tracked by a set of 46 outcome indicators. In launching the policy strategy, WHO director-general, Dr Tedros Ghebreyesus, opined that the global vision is to attain the highest standard of health for all people while taking cognizance of the current changes in the world; including effects of the Covid-19 pandemic.

To track the progress of these ambitious targets, a parallel focus should be on using timely, reliable and actionable data to achieve measurable health impact. Dashboards provide a summarized but highly intuitive way of visualizing data.

This is important for informed decision-making. Whereas WHO is helping countries measure this progress at the country level, granular action is needed by counties to localize dashboards that are specific to their healthcare burdens and dynamics.

In order to achieve the common goal of delivering impact, co-creation can play an important role during the development of such dashboards. This means that the users of such healthcare intelligence ought to be part of the development process.

This will help create useful tools that solve the actual problems they are intended to, promote constant learning and best practice sharing.