Society

Confession: I ‘voted’ Trump and would repeat were I an American voter

trump-golf

President Donald Trump returns to the White House from playing golf in Washington, DC on November 7, 2020, after Joe Biden was declared the winner of the 2020 presidential election. AFP PHOTO

edwardomete

Summary

  • To many global citizens aspiring for a new world, a conflicting paradox is understanding the difference between America and Americans.
  • The two are not the same thing, and to many, President Trump seemed to offer a clear distinction on the two.
  • The man aside, he has his flaws, but so do we all.

Four years ago, around this time, seated at a cosmopolitan dinner table, deep in the Tsavo, a mock US election was held. Donald Trump with just one of eight votes ended up as the president in the real election: I was his sole voter. My decision, to vote for Trump was based on his philosophy; business is good for everyone and every business person aims to come out tops.

Last week, President Trump was seeking re-election in what is easily the most watched political event of 2020. All gaze seems fixated on the elections, ongoing at the time of writing this article. Albeit our two neighbours Tanzania (last week) and Uganda (a month or so) are embroiled in election fever, not much attention was given to them locally.

As a global superpower, the ramifications of whoever wins in the race are certain to trickle down to African States, Kenya included. Mainly because of her foreign development aid plans support most African nation’s health systems. In Kenya, healthcare, is visibly one of the largest beneficiary, through USaid, PEPFAR, Global Fund as well as other agencies the US holds sway in, as majority contributor.

For vast sections of the African populace, President Trump and his policies have been a concern. Yet, an equal number both in the US and locally agree with them. I in particular support his “tough medicine” approach, as this will spur us to finally start taking care of our own problems. Hopefully, this also gives us independence in exercising our sovereignty as Africa and Africans. Aid has been used to arm twist nations into making choices and decisions not their intent for a while.

Through his “America First” philosophy, a significant global reduction in US foreign aid was felt. Multiple agencies’ funding was cut down. Locally, part of the fear of President Trump’s re-election is a reduction in such donor funds, if anything from his first term is to go by.

To many global citizens aspiring for a new world, a conflicting paradox is understanding the difference between America and Americans. The two are not the same thing, and to many, President Trump seemed to offer a clear distinction on the two.

The man aside, he has his flaws, but so do we all. The issue has been in lumping his persona with the nation’s philosophy. At least from my personal perspective, it is easy to see why certain sections identify with this.

With minerals no longer the driving force behind western nation’s forays into Africa, the new extractives are technology based. Ever the businessman, President Trump identified with the philosophy that war is bad for business and every nation should pay its bills.

Good luck to the winner.