Editorials

Blacklist rogue contractors

rogue

Any contractor who goes against the agreed standards and completion dates for mega projects ought to be punished. FILE PHOTO | NMG

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Summary

  • For a long time, public projects in Kenya have been delayed or ruined by rogue contractors, who pocket taxpayer funds and fail to deliver on the projects.
  • Clearing the market of these shady companies will be a first and vital step in regaining the confidence of these funding institutions in local contractors.

The banning of a Kenyan power company from projects funded by the African Development Bank (AfDB) due to fraudulent practices should serve as a lesson not just for fellow contractors, but also local financial institutions and the government on how to deal with rogue firms.

That the AfDB and the World Bank have blacklisted nearly 20 firms over fraud and quality concerns is evidence enough that this is a big problem and one that requires action from every contracting agency to tackle successfully.

For a long time, public projects in Kenya have been delayed or ruined by rogue contractors, who pocket taxpayer funds and fail to deliver on the projects.

The government, while aware of these practices, has continually awarded new jobs to the same firms, entrenching the culture of impunity and corruption that continues to cost the country dearly.

As a country, we now risk missing out on key infrastructure development that is funded by the likes of the AfDB due to this fraud record.

Clearing the market of these shady companies will be a first and vital step in regaining the confidence of these funding institutions in local contractors.

This can only happen if the government and local lenders take firm action and blacklist those implicated in dirty practices.