Editorials

Ease of business a priority

state-uhuru

President Uhuru Kenyatta delivers his Seventh State of the Nation Address during a Joint Sitting of Parliament in line with Article 132 of the Constitution. PHOTO | PSCU

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Summary

  • While the KQ nationalisation will aid its turnaround, easing ways of doing business is the one thing that should give both the Executive and Legislature sleepless nights.
  • That an increased number of people is starting new businesses is encouraging, but it could also be out of push to survive.
  • What’s more, the younger people are being encouraged to be their own bosses through innovation, which involves running businesses profitably.

For the umpteenth time, President Uhuru Kenyatta last week asked Parliament to fast-track the passing of laws that would ensure Kenya Airways is nationalised and the cost of doing business is reduced as much as possible.

While the KQ nationalisation will aid its turnaround, easing ways of doing business is the one thing that should give both the Executive and Legislature sleepless nights.

That an increased number of people is starting new businesses is encouraging, but it could also be out of push to survive.

What’s more, the younger people are being encouraged to be their own bosses through innovation, which involves running businesses profitably.

While surveys show that Kenya was doing better in terms of cost of doing business ranking, entrepreneurs and traders themselves are telling a different story, citing the uncountable layers they have to go through, especially the legalities.

These discourage starting off. Worse, they lead to deaths of existing entities that should be employing people. Again, the ease of doing business also determines the flow of investments into the country.

As Parliament passes laws, the Executive needs to ensure that doing business becomes a straightforward endeavour that will not only create jobs, improve tax collection, but lead to growth of the economy.