Editorials

NHIF defaults worrying

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NHIF Building in Upper Hill, Nairobi. FILE PHOTO | NMG

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Summary

  • The revelation that more than half of the National Hospital Insurance Fund (NHIF) members have stopped making contributions to the scheme is worrying.
  • The State-run medical scheme has disclosed that 5.7 million members or 54 percent of the total 10.6 million members had stopped their contributions by the end of last month.

The revelation that more than half of the National Hospital Insurance Fund (NHIF) members have stopped making contributions to the scheme is worrying.

The State-run medical scheme has disclosed that 5.7 million members or 54 percent of the total 10.6 million members had stopped their contributions by the end of last month.

While some may have defaulted on premiums due to Covid-19 economic difficulties, the fund says others only come in when they have a medical need and leave once they have benefited.

This trend is worrying and risks the stability of the NHIF since it is against the principles of good faith and pooling of resources, which are the bedrock of insurance.

The law may have little cure for moral problems and it is therefore up to Kenyans to do the right thing so that the NHIF is stable.

Large economies such as the UK have achieved so much with national insurance schemes and it is therefore for the good of Kenyans if the NHIF is stable and empowered to provide even more services.