Editorials

Verify Britons on payroll

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A pedestrian walk past the National Treasury building in Nairobi on June 12, 2014. FILE PHOTO | NMG

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Summary

  • Kenyan taxpayers paid Sh150 million to the retirees and another Sh112 million to the widows of the deceased foreign workers hired by the British colonial administration, according to an audit report.
  • The colonial pensioners are required to file life certificates every April and when they die, Crown Agents Bank is required to delete their names from the records.
  • To date, there is no evidence that the life certificates have been produced prior to the payments.

It is scandalous that the government has not bothered to independently verify the existence of British pensioners who have been receiving payments since their retirement 58 years ago.

This means that a large part of the money that the Treasury wires to Crown Agents Bank each year could be wasted and the lack of interest in stopping the payments amounts to fraudulent negligence.

Kenyan taxpayers paid Sh150 million to the retirees and another Sh112 million to the widows of the deceased foreign workers hired by the British colonial administration, according to an audit report. The Treasury has ignored the laid down accountability processes and must now comply with Parliament’s demand that it implements them.

The colonial pensioners are required to file life certificates every April and when they die, Crown Agents Bank is required to delete their names from the records. To date, there is no evidence that the life certificates have been produced prior to the payments. The government cannot rely on Crown Agents Bank any more. It must directly or through an independent firm, verify the existence of the beneficiaries and weed out the names of those who have died.