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Kenya tackles growing threat of deadly animal viruses transmitted to humans

Chicken for sale on display at Chebole, Bomet. The global migration of birds has increased chances of investing poutry, hence the need for vigilance. PHOTO | BENSON MOMANYI | NMG
Chicken for sale on display at Chebole, Bomet. The global migration of birds has increased chances of investing poutry, hence the need for vigilance. PHOTO | BENSON MOMANYI | NMG 

A debate in an online forum for veterinarians cracked jokes about the attenuated romantic gene in veterinarians, their inability to sweep a woman off her feet.

The social scientists – sociologists, communication lecturers and others - expressed their frustration at dating the “cattle doctors”.

For a minute, the two groups looked like they would never agree until fishermen in Uganda noticed dead birds on the shores of Lutembe beaches and reported to the authorities last month, and an alert was then issued that they had died of avian flu.

When the news reached Kenya, an emergency meeting between veterinarians and doctors was held at Kabete Veterinary Labs in Nairobi and a team knowledgeable in tracking diseases—epidemiology— assembled. Alongside those who would be consulted were the social scientists.