Shipping & Logistics

Lessons from Dar on unclogging city traffic jams

A Dar Rapid Transit bus (ART) officials say the network, which started with 50,000 passengers per day, is currently ferrying an average of 200,000 passengers per day. FILE PHOTO | NMG
A Dar Rapid Transit bus (ART) officials say the network, which started with 50,000 passengers per day, is currently ferrying an average of 200,000 passengers per day. FILE PHOTO | NMG  

Nairobi, where at least one third of the gross domestic product is generated, is faced with infrastructure challenges that threaten to slow down the economic growth through traffic snarl-ups if not addressed.

The Kenyan capital city, which was ranked top among 15 African cities studied by the World Bank for having the slowest traffic, has a lot to learn from Dar es Salaam after rafts of public transport reforms began taking shape in the Tanzanian city.

“The prevalence of expansion, particularly leapfrog development is just one pattern that makes urban commuting challenging in African cities. Another is deficient transportation infrastructure.

Traffic congestion cripples the economy in cities such as Nairobi, where the average journey-to-work time is one of the longest among 15 cities studied,” the World Bank wrote in the February report.