Market News

Developers set to adopt new energy saving standards

developers

Kenyan developers will be required to adopt a building code that ensures new buildings cut on electricity costs and are run largely on renewable energy. FILE PHOTO | NMG

brianngugi_img

Summary

  • Kenyan developers will be required to adopt a building code that ensures new buildings cut on electricity costs and are run largely on renewable energy.
  • This is in line with a new private sector backed government policy on energy that seeks to rally the country to save on energy costs and cut climate changing emissions.

Kenyan developers will be required to adopt a building code that ensures new buildings cut on electricity costs and are run largely on renewable energy.

This is in line with a new private sector backed government policy on energy that seeks to rally the country to save on energy costs and cut climate changing emissions.

Under the proposed guidelines, new buildings will be compelled to become much more energy efficient in turn helping to cut electricity bills and greenhouse gas emissions.

"There should be 10 percent share of newly built floor area compliant with energy efficiency requirements in the total building stock from the current baseline of zero," proposes the Kenya National Energy Efficiency and Conservation Strategy.

"Secondly, two percent of the buildings should have adopted American Society of Heating, Refrigerating and Air Conditioning Engineers (ASHRAE) Standards for energy efficiency of buildings, or equivalent."

The ASHRAE is an organisation devoted to the advancement of indoor-environment-control technology in the heating, ventilation and air conditioning industry.

Energy Cabinet Secretary Charles Keter said the new policy is long overdue and challenged Kenyans to adopt alternative ways to save and use power.

“Improving energy efficiency will help reduce the demand for fossil fuels and related greenhouse gas emissions,” he said.