Columnists

Stop strikes and stick to road safety law

Passengers along Ngong road hike a lift from a private car after matatu crew went on strike on November 29, 2012 to protest the implementation of the new traffic laws that will take effect from December 1, 2012. Photo/SALATON NJAU
Passengers along Ngong road hike a lift from a private car after matatu crew went on strike on November 29, 2012 to protest the implementation of the new traffic laws that will take effect from December 1, 2012. Photo/SALATON NJAU   Nation Media Group

Thursday’s strike by matatu operators who were protesting over the impending implementation of the tough new rules on road safety raises important questions about our national culture.

There appears to be a general belief that impunity is the preserve of politicians and senior civil servants who cannot keep their fingers off the public’s cookie jar.

However, an analysis of our society easily reveals that the culture of disobeying laws and disregarding the welfare of others is pervasive and knows no class or ethnic boundaries.

Nowhere is this more manifest than on our roads, where drivers — mostly of public vehicles — flout rules without the slightest regard for the safety of their passengers or themselves.