Shipping & Logistics

KPA eyes more efficiency as key projects near completion

port

The ongoing construction of a new berth at the Port of Mombasa. FILE PHOTO | NMG

Summary

  • The Kenya Ports Authority (KPA) expects to improve its efficiency in the next three months as some of the key projects which were delayed as a result of Covid-19 are set to be completed.
  • KPA acting managing director John Mwangemi said construction of phase 2 of the Second Container Terminal (CT2) whose completion is at 88 percent will be done before the end of 2021.

The Kenya Ports Authority (KPA) expects to improve its efficiency in the next three months as some of the key projects which were delayed as a result of Covid-19 are set to be completed.

KPA acting managing director John Mwangemi said construction of phase 2 of the Second Container Terminal (CT2) whose completion is at 88 percent will be done before the end of 2021 and will bring on board an additional capacity of 450,000 twenty foot equivalent units (TEUs).

Mr Mwangemi said the new facility will increase Mombasa port capacity to 2.1 million TEUs per annum.

“Apart from the completed construction of Kipevu road which is a partnership between KPA and Trademark Africa which is only waiting to be linked with the Mombasa Nairobi Highway once the latter is complete, CT2 will play a key role as we shall never experience congestion at the port,” said Mr Mwangemi.

The Kipevu road project which entailed expansion of the road from Gate 18 to Changamwe roundabout into six lanes with provision for pedestrian walkways will be crucial in reducing congestion at the port by cutting truck turnaround time.

“The expansion of the road from gate 18/20 by adding two additional lanes and canopy, and construction of gate 24 with six lanes has improved cargo evacuation due to quick truck turnaround time,” said the acting MD.

In the next three months KPA is also expected to complete the construction of a new and bigger Kipevu Oil Terminal (KOT), which is 93.5 percent complete, will have four berths capable of handling import and export of five different hydrocarbon products which include crude oil, heavy fuel oil, LPG and three types of white oil products.

Speaking during the East Africa Maritime Awards in Mombasa, Mr Mwangemi said the new oil terminal will increase fuel handling capacity, reduce vessel waiting time and enhance efficiency.

The Port of Lamu has so far received seven new ship calls with transshipment cargo, the latest being Mv Seago Istanbul which discharged 498 TEUs.

Kenya Revenue Authority (KRA) southern region coordinator Joseph Tonui, said following pre-arrival clearance by customs officers based at the Port of Lamu, through the Integrated Customs Management System (iCMS), MV Seago Line Istanbul was a vote of confidence for the port.

“The arrival of the Maersk Shipping Line vessel that shipped 490 TEUs of cargo is a sign that the future is bright for the port as it is on the path to become a major transshipment hub in the region, as it had been envisaged,” said Mr Tonui.

The KRA coordinator said the vessel had different consignment which included cooking oil, wheat flour, sugar, used clothing, rice, ready-made garments, fabrics, footwear, vehicles and personal effects. “The consignment was meant for transshipment will be re-shipped by another vessel, MV Ionian Express to consignees in Zanzibar,” said Mr Tonui.

The KRA has called upon Kenyan investors and other traders in the region to emulate the investors from Zanzibar who have used the port for the third time, a clear demonstration that it is cost-effective to import cargo through the Port of Lamu.