Counties

Building of energy plant for recycling Dandora waste to start

DUMPSITE

Waste dumped at Dandora. The rich in Kenya can invest in sanitation projects to help the poor. File

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Summary

  • Initially, the project was supposed to start last month but it encountered a delay in the tendering process following the completion of feasibility studies by KenGen.
  • The NMS also plans to employ street children to separate solid waste before they are taken to the dumpsite.
  • Mr Badi said initially NMS had projected a public-private partnership but noted that the Ministry of Energy took it upon itself to build the factory at Dandora to harness energy.

The plan to set up an energy plant to recycle waste at Dandora dumpsite is set to kick off this month, the Nairobi Metropolitan Services (NMS) has said.

NMS Director General Mohammed Badi said the tendering process for the power plant, which is being implemented by NMS together with KenGen, will commence this month.

Initially, the project was supposed to start last month but it encountered a delay in the tendering process following the completion of feasibility studies by KenGen.

The NMS also plans to employ street children to separate solid waste before they are taken to the dumpsite.

Mr Badi said initially NMS had projected a public-private partnership but noted that the Ministry of Energy took it upon itself to build the factory at Dandora to harness energy.

“The process is out and we have set an agreement between us and the ministry; they will set up the factory and NMS will supply them with garbage,” said Mr Badi.

Under the deal, KenGen said the NMS will make available the land within or around Dandora dumpsite, while KenGen will finance, develop, and operate the power plant.

KenGen last year August invited expressions of interest (EoI) from eligible consultancy firms to conduct a feasibility study for development and operation of the waste to energy plant.

Mr Badi said the power plant will solve the county’s garbage problem and contribute to renewable energy pool.

The Dandora dumpsite is more than three times full, holding more than 1.8 million tonnes of solid waste against a capacity of 500,000 tonnes with over 2,500 tonnes of waste is deposited at the site daily.