Editorials

Set Bomas of Kenya free

bomas

A section of the conference hall at the Bomas of Kenya. FILE PHOTO | NMG

For nearly three decades, the Tourism Finance Corporation has failed to delink Bomas of Kenya from its ambit, occasioning operational and legal challenges for the iconic conferencing and cultural heritage facility.

The Tourism Finance Corporation’s board approved the separation of Bomas of Kenya from its control in 1992.

In 2002, the Attorney-General in a legal interpretation of the State Corporations Act, Cap446, concluded that a State corporation cannot own another.

Auditor-General Nancy Gathungu says in spite of these interventions, very minimal progress has been made on the matter.

This flagrant disregard of the law is unacceptable and officials in the two State firms as well as those from the Ministry of Tourism ought to be put to task.

In December last year, the Treasury said there were plans to merge Bomas and Kenyatta International Convention Centre, in efforts to accelerate the recovery of the pandemic-hit tourism industry.

The delinking of Bomas and Tourism Finance Corporation should therefore be accelerated. There is no reason whatsoever why the State cannot audit all its properties and put its paperwork in order.