Health & Fitness

Benefits of balancing healthcare work and life

healthcare

To have a productive healthcare workforce, it is paramount for healthcare organisations to lay an equal emphasis on the motivator factors. PHOTO | SHUTTERSTOCK

According to the World Health Organisation, human resources are a critical pillar of any healthcare system. This fact has been underpinned by the Covid-19 pandemic, which has brought to fore the need to have a sufficient and well-trained workforce to address the healthcare needs of the citizenry.

However, little or no efforts have been expended to ensure that this workforce maintains sufficient mental stamina to handle the rigours of providing high-quality healthcare services, especially in emerging countries.

In healthcare settings, a lot more efforts are channelled towards ‘hygiene’ factors that were described by psychologist Frederick Herzberg.

These factors are extrinsic to the nature of the work at hand and include aspects such as company policies, supervisory practices and salary scales.

Interestingly, whereas the absence of these factors results in workers’ dissatisfaction, their presence does not necessarily lead to a higher worker’s motivation.

On the other hand, ‘motivator’ factors are intrinsic conditions of the job itself such as recognition, achievement, personal growth, challenging work, responsibility, opportunity to do something meaningful, involvement in decision making and a sense of impactful importance to an organisation and society.

These have been shown to result in positive satisfaction. Unfortunately, they are often neglected in favour of hygiene factors.

To have a productive healthcare workforce, it is paramount for healthcare organisations to lay an equal emphasis on the motivator factors.